Little Tavern Washington No. 20

I walked over to this one, now the Li’l Pub while I was waiting for the Library of Congress to open. The exterior, though painted, is well preserved, still even retaining its leaded glass windows. Inside appears to have been altered substantially to make it more functional as a bar.

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Detailing around the door.

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Sides still white

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655 Pennsylvania Ave. S.E. Washington, DC 20003
Permit no. 20864 issued 11/26/1937 , architect Frank B. Proctor, Estimated Cost $5000.

Little Tavern: Washington no. 7

I went and hunted down the site of Washington No. 7 today, which opened on December 23, 1931. From the size of the tree growing up through the vacant lot, I would say its been gone for a while at this point. The building itself is gone, but the outline of the signature Little Tavern roof is still visible on the wall of the building next door. The brick basement is all still there, covered by a steel framework which I would assume was the floor of the LT. And what’s this I see? Green enameled steel roof tiles? Too bad they’re a story beneath street level and behind a plywood construction fence.

This entire section of G street looks like its waiting to be torn down or otherwise redeveloped. The buildings to the left are all vacant. The Hahn / Florsheim shoe store in the old bank building is also gone, though it seems the National Bank of Washington still occupies it and the buildings seem to have fallen on hard times. For those who don’t know the area, it’s all high priced offices and condos around this cluster.

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The vacant lot

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Next door to the National Bank of Washington

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ghost of an LT

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Sorry for the crappy pic- I may be tall, but the eight foot plywood fence is taller, and getting pictures through the 1/2″ gap between two of the panels just wasn’t happening. This is the steel framing over a brick foundation and basement. Lots of tree going on.

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Rusty green tiles from the Little Tavern green roof.

Washington no. 7 was (is?) located at
1344 G street northwest Washington DC

Greetings from Washington DC

I got some photos today from my dad, who went down on a food and photo safari this morning. All photos are copyright Michael G. Stewart.

Golden Bull – Liquor

Ohio Restaurant

This building will become a trolley station for the new line.



Argonaut

My dad

Uneeda Biscuit

Atlas Theater

S and S shoe repairing

Hen Lung Laundry

Hymie’s Restaurant – Washington DC

Today, my dad and I tracked down and photographed what used to be Hymie’s Restaurant, an old homebuilt diner in Washington, DC.

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I couldn’t find much on it, other than that it was owned by Mary Hyman and her husband, and that it was held up in 1970.

According to the court transcripts:

At approximately 1:20 P.M. on May 11, 1970, two men, one armed with a sawed-off shotgun, held up Hymie’s Restaurant and Carry-Out at 4408 Arkansas Avenue, N.W., in Washington. The man with the shotgun remained at the door of the restaurant while the other man entered the store and told the proprietress, Mrs. Mary Hyman, to put the money from the cash register in a bag. She complied, placing approximately $86.00 in a bag, which the man took. She noticed that this man was short, very dark, and that his head was cleanshaven. The robbers then left the store and escaped.

The only other record of it is found here, and reads:
Hymie’s Restaurant on Arkansas Avenue and Allison Streets NW. The
BEST cheeseburger for miles and Mr. and Mrs.
Hyman were the nicest proprietors of a business you’d ever want to
meet. It is now an auto parts store…

The signage currently reads, Andre’s Auto Sales, but there’s a for rent sign up, with the phone number, (301)-649-2361.

DC / MD diner trip – May 24, 2009

This was my first real diner trip in a while. I met up today with Mike Engle, author of Diners of New York; the man behind NYdiners.com, and roadside buff and frequent Zippy the Pinhead contributor Ed Engel at the American City Diner, and headed out from there.

The first stop of the day was the American City Diner of 5532 Connecticut Ave NW Washington, DC. It’s a late ’80s Kullman, one of the early retro-styled diners, and one of the ones that did it right. For some photos as it appeared when new, click here. Since then, it’s been added on to, with a large side addition, and a front porch which obscures everything to the left of the vestibule.
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The Left side of the diner- 2009
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The left side of the diner – 1989
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The former Howard Theater. Great rusty marquis on this one.
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The now abandoned Wonderbread / Hostess Factory

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Ran into a little excitement along the way between these two stops, but all’s well that ends well.

Northeast Academy of Dance Neon sign. Look at the detail at the left hand corner of the sign.
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We hit up the Capital City Diner, which was moved here on the 20th. Watch the video of it being moved. This Silk City, formerly of Avoca New York, has made its way to the Trinidad neighborhood of Northeast DC.
Photos at its original location and some backstory can be found at :A Real Historic Diner Coming to DC!

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This next leg of the trip had some neat neon and signage

A&R Auto Parts
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Syd’s Drive In / Liquor
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Cross Roads
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Tesst theater
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Hyattsville Hardware / Franklin’s
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Calvert House
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Silver Spring’s old Canada Dry bottling plant
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A quick stop at the Silver Spring Tastee was made.

Now
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Then
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More old photos can be found here.

Then a side trip to Forest Glen, parts of which have deteriorated greatly since my last visit.
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Dinner at the Tastee Diner in Bethesda
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Then
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And the trip’s final stop at Bethesda’s former Little Tavern. A 1990 photo of it, when it was still a Little Tavern, can be found on the Diner Hotline.

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The American City Diner – Washington DC

I have a couple more posts of these old slide scans to go.

The American City diner was built by Kullman in 1989, and was one of the first old style diners to be built. And it really nailed the look. Just take a look at the photos. With the exception of larger dimensions, the detailing and proportions were kept essentially the same as a ’40s model. It’s beauty was in its simplicity, the design was clean and beautiful. Based on pictures of them from when they were built, this one and the Silver Diner in Rockville are my two favorites from this era of diners.

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Photo is copyright Michael G. Stewart

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Photo is copyright Michael G. Stewart

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Photo is copyright Michael G. Stewart

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Photo is copyright Michael G. Stewart

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Photo is copyright Michael G. Stewart

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Photo is copyright Michael G. Stewart

And here’s how it looks now. An awning has been added, obscuring the roof stainless work. The roof has been painted blue and red, a signboard has been added to the vestibule. A googie-esque addition has been added to the left hand side, as has a now closed in patio seating area, entirely covering the diner to the left of the vestibule. Everything about the diner has so much added onto it that the diner that was installed in 1989 is hardly recognizable.

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Waffle Shop- Washington DC

I swung by the Waffle Shop in downtown DC yesterday, and was sad to see that the building was empty. The business has moved down the block a few doors to the left and is still operating, but no longer from their classic, horseshoe countered former home.

Look at the design of this place- the details.
See the iridescent gold and silver tilework wrapping around the corner of the building? How open the building is with the glass facade and thin, outward canted supports? The terrazzo floor? The repeating horseshoe shape of the counter with a hat/purse rack underneath? How the ceiling slopes towards the back of the building?

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